Spot light on Police conduct in W9 & W10

Some suggest things have not changed much in W9 & W10 since these days 50 years ago

In light of two police conduct investigations by the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC), the spot light has been put on the Metropolitan Police activities recently in W9 and W10. More so, with the release of Mangrove 9 film highlighting well what the Met were up to in the same neighbourhood some 50 years ago. Some have suggest nothing much has changed. 

Two disturbing policing incidents in the neighbourhood l grew up recently have raised questions of how the Police go about their business in the locality. The first was the stop and search of Bianca Williams  in her car, along with her partner and child along Lanhill Rd, W9. Thankfully it was videoed recorded on a mobile, so we can at least see some of the sequence of events. Saying this the elite athletic couple want the investigation to deal their racism allegations rather than just potential misconduct of the five officers involved in the case for a much more serious gross misconduct investigation. The couple are considering boycotting the investigation. 

The second incident are in many ways far more serious one arises after News night journalist – Richard Watson – highlighted the neglect of investigation into racist attack to three black women along Kilburn Lane, W10 last Christmas. For nearly two weeks after the attack officers failed to recover CCTV or take witness statements, even from the victims. The three women feel the police made racist assumptions about them and this hampered the investigation. The probe into the crime was closed in April, but the Met reopened it last month following News night investigation. The IOPC is also investigating the officers for their conduct but it is not sure on what grounds. 

The location of both these incidents are not more than 10-15 mins by foot. 

All this makes the televising of the Mangrove 9 movie drama this coming weekend on BBC all the more intriguing, as it not recalls an important bit of history for the black community in London and the UK but also for the locality, 50 years ago. The Mangrove Restaurant was repeatedly raided by the police, on grounds of drug possession, despite a lack of evidence. The nine were acquitted twice with the trial being highly significant in that it was the first judicial acknowledgement of racial prejudice in the Metropolitan Police. So not surprisingly some are suggesting what has changed at all in the locality.